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Cold sores and bite marks inside your lips


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#1 Guests

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 10:50 PM

a week ago, i was eating too fast and i bit my own lip, and now it's not healing, and whenever i eat or brush my teeth, it STINGS. it doesn't help either, that my boyfriend kissed me and he has a coldsore at the exactly same place i have a a bite mark in my lip. THEN, afterwards, i got a coldsore ABOVE MY BITE MARK. what a nice combo o_o..


so my question is:
1. are coldsores contagious then? and
2. what should i do about the pain and
3. what should i do to get rid of it?

oww. T_T

#2 hoodpolitics

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 11:22 PM

does cold sores = gential herpe complex 1?

#3 Andromeda18_

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 01:20 AM

a week ago, i was eating too fast and i bit my own lip, and now it's not healing, and whenever i eat or brush my teeth, it STINGS. it doesn't help either, that my boyfriend kissed me and he has a coldsore at the exactly same place i have a a bite mark in my lip. THEN, afterwards, i got a coldsore ABOVE MY BITE MARK. what a nice combo o_o..
so my question is:
1. are coldsores contagious then? and
2. what should i do about the pain and
3. what should i do to get rid of it?

oww. T_T


What you have in your mouth, from biting your lip, is know as a mouth ulcer. Whenever I get one of those they take forever to heal and are painful as hell!
Here's a bit of what causes mouth ulcers and how to treat them:

Causes

The exact cause of mouth ulcers is unknown, but in some cases they are thought to be caused by an overreaction by the body's own immune system. Factors that appear to provoke them include stress, fatigue, illness, injury from accidental biting, hormonal changes, menstruation, sudden weight loss, food allergies and deficiencies in vitamin B12, iron and folic acid. Some drugs, such as nicorandil, have been linked with mouth ulcers.

Mouth ulcers are thought to form when the body becomes aware of and attacks chemicals which it does not recognize. The presence of the unrecognized molecules garners a reaction by the lymphocytes, which trigger a reaction that causes the damage of a mouth ulcer.

Trauma to the mouth is a common cause of mouth ulcers. Physical trauma, such as toothbrush abrasion, poking with sharp food, accidental biting, or dental braces can cause mouth ulcers by breaking the mucous membrane. Other factors, such as chemical irritants or thermal injury, may also lead to the development of ulcers. However in many cases, the precise cause is unknown.

A common cause of ulcers is gluten intolerance, in which case consumption of wheat, rye, or barley can result in chronic mouth ulcers. If gluten intolerance is the cause, prevention means taking most breads, pastas, cakes, pies, cookies, scones, biscuits, beers etc. out of the diet and substituting gluten-free varieties where available. Artificial sugars, such as those found in diet cola and sugarless gum, have been reported as causes of mouth ulcers as well. They can also be linked to an increased intake of acid such as the acidic form Vitamin C or citric acid. In this case the sores disappear after intake decreases or a non acidic form of the vitamin is taken.

Other disorders can cause mouth ulcers, including oral thrush, leukoplakia, gingivostomatitis, and oral lichen planus. Mouth ulcers are also associated with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, coeliac disease (gluten sensitivity), bullous pemphigoid, and Behçet's disease. Repeat episodes of mouth ulcers can also be indicative of an immunodeficiency, signalling low levels of immunoglobulin in the mucous membrane of the mouth. Chemotherapy is a common cause of mouth ulcers. The treatment depends on the believed cause.

A common urban myth is that mouth ulcers are directly connected to the onset of the herpes simplex virus, but in reality ulcers associated with herpes (or cold sores) are of an entirely different nature from mouth ulcers, which are not contagious.

Home treatment

Mouth ulcers normally heal without treatment within 1–2 weeks.
The best start is to make sure good oral hygiene is maintained, and spicy/acidic/salty foods and drinks are avoided as they may irritate existing ulcers. In addition, one can treat the pain with several pain-relieving gels like Anbesol, Bonjela, Campho-Phenique, Orabase B, Zilactin or Kanka, available in drugstores. Some people claim that such gels also accelerate the healing of their ulcers. Additionally, holding moderately concentrated alcohol in the mouth over the area of the ulcer is widely purported to be an effective remedy, presumably because of alcohol's diuretic effect (and, likewise, the more concentrated, the more diuretic), although there is no direct evidence to support this.

Another useful remedy is to use a sticky balm named Dexaltin Oral Paste (Dexamethasone 1–mg/g).

Triamcinolone Acetonide dental paste can be very effective; the steroid reduces the immune system's response in the area of the ulcer. It is available by prescription only.

Use of a hydrogen peroxide antiseptic mouthwash can help to clean debris and bacteria that can accumulate in an ulcer, thus reducing complications associated with its presence. This treatment is widely available at pharmacies from companies such as Colgate, whose product is called Peroxyl. Recently, the Oral-B product Amosan has become an increasingly popular oral cleanser. A recent double-blind crossover study has suggested that its use may prevent or retard the colonization and multiplication of anaerobic bacteria, such as those which are known to inhabit oral wounds.

Other home remedies vary in efficacy. Certain techniques heal mouth ulcers for some people, but there are no treatments with widespread medical support. Most seem to be based on an antiseptic (mild antibiotic), an antacid, or both. Antiseptic techniques suggested include the following:

* Gently clean the mouth ulcers by roughening with a toothbrush; when clean, apply antiseptic.
* Swab the mouth ulcers with sea-buckthorn fruit oil or hydrogen peroxide.
* Rinse the mouth with an antiseptic mouthwash (e.g. Listerine), which can relieve pain for a few hours.
* Pouring salt directly on the ulcer can prove effective, however this can be extremely painful and can scar. Avoiding pressure on the ulcer after applying the salt minimizes the pain.
* Apply glyoxide directly to the ulcers and swish around mouth.
* Rinse the mouth with salt water—1 teaspoon of salt dissolved in 1 cup (250 ml) of warm water (a.k.a. a saline solution).
* Take Lysine-L supplements.
* Rinse mouth and especially the affected area with sage tea 3 times a day. The improvement can be seen as early as within 24 hours.
* Paint half-strength gentian violet solution on the ulcer.[3]
* Gargle a mouthful of warm vinegar with a half-tablespoon of salt for about 30 seconds, 3 times per day; this may be extremely painful, but healing can be seen in as early as 2 days.
* Apply oil of cloves using a cotton swab or Q-tip. This is initially very painful, but will result in a period of time where the affected area is quite numb, allowing painless chewing or talking.
* Some have applied anise directly on the ulcer.

Antacid techniques suggested include the following:

* Swab the ulcers with Milk of Magnesia.
* Apply powdered alum directly to the ulcers—available in the spice aisle at grocery stores; this can be very painful, but is proven to work.
* Make a paste of baking soda and water; apply directly to the ulcers.
* Make a paste of crushed Tums (antacid) and water—apply directly to the ulcers.
* Rinse the mouth with a baking soda-water mix—1 teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in 1 cup (250 ml) of warm water.
* Avoid acidic foods such as tomato, citrus, soft drinks, and vinaigrette salad dressings.
* Make a mix of half Mylanta and half Benadryl and hold in the mouth for up to three minutes.

Combination therapies recommend the use of the antiseptic before the antacid, that is, swab mouth ulcers with hydrogen peroxide and then swab them with Milk of Magnesia.

A good temporary remedy for the pain of the mouth ulcer is to numb the affected area with ice. Although this may cause intense pain in the beginning, it is highly effective and lasts for about half an hour, depending on the number of ice cubes used and the time spent using the ice cubes.



Now, onto cold sores. What you call 'cold sore' is in fact herpes and it's definitely contagious and recurrent (you can't get rid of it for good).

What are cold sores?
Cold sores are a type of facial lesion that are found either on the lips or else on the skin in the area immediately adjacent to the mouth. Some equivalent terms that are used to refer to cold sores are "fever blisters" and the medical term "recurrent herpes labialis."

Specifically what does cause cold sores?

Cold sores are caused by the herpes simplex virus. No doubt you've heard of "herpes" before, but don't jump ahead of yourself. There are actually two types of herpes simplex virus, "type 1" and "type 2."

Type 1 herpes simplex virus.
Herpes simplex virus type 1 ("HSV1") generally only infects those body tissues that lie "above the waistline" and it is HSV1 that causes cold sores in the majority of cases.
Type 2 herpes simplex virus.
Herpes simplex virus type 2 ("HSV2") usually only infects those body tissues that lie "below the waistline" and it is this virus that is also known as "genital herpes." Herpes simplex virus type 2 is not usually the virus that causes cold sores, although it can.

How do people get exposed to the herpes simplex virus that causes their cold sores?

When you think of having an infection you usually assume that you were recently exposed to the germ that has caused your problem. With cold sores this is not the case. Cold sores are not a sign of a recently acquired herpes simplex infection but instead a reactivation of herpes virus particles already living in your body. Cold sores occur when latent herpes simplex virus particles, which have been lying dormant ("asleep"), become reactivated.


Where does this dormant herpes simplex virus come from?

The dormant virus particles come from a previous herpes infection. A person's initial herpes simplex virus infection, termed "primary herpetic stomatitis," does not usually take the form of a cold sore and therefore a person may not relate their initial exposure to the herpes virus to the recurrent cold sores that they get.


What are the signs and symptoms of a person's initial herpes (HSV1) infection?

The signs and symptoms associated with a person's initial infection of the herpes simplex virus (termed "primary herpetic stomatitis") usually take the following form:

* The first signs of the infection are characterized by nonspecific constitutional symptoms such as: fever, irritability, headache, and pain upon swallowing.
* A day or so after the infection's initial signs have appeared the person's mouth becomes painful and their gums become intensely inflamed.
* Usually by day three of the infection a number of tiny blisters have formed throughout the person's mouth.
* These blisters soon rupture resulting in gray colored ulcers.
* These ulcers can be very painful and often interfere with a person's ability to eat.
* The ulcers will eventually heal. Usually the entire infection has run its course within 10 to 14 days.

Why don't the symptoms of primary herpetic stomatitis seem familiar to you?

If you don't remember having had the classic signs and symptoms of primary herpetic stomatitis it might be because you experienced them as a small child. Most cases occur before the age of 7.

In other cases, if you don't remember having all the classic signs and symptoms, it's probably because your case was subclinical. This is by far the most common occurrence. It has been estimated that 99% of all cases of primary herpetic stomatitis are subclinical, meaning that the course the infection ran was so slight that its symptoms were not apparent. It is quite possible that when you had the infection that, at most, you only experienced one or two mild mouth sores.


What About Treatment?

Although there is no cure for herpes, some drugs have been effective in reducing the frequency and duration of outbreaks. It might be a good idea to discuss options with your doctor.

During an outbreak, keep the infected area as clean and dry as possible. This will help your natural healing processes. Some doctors recommend warm showers in order to cleanse the infected area. Afterwards, towel dry gently, or dry the area with a hair dryer on a low or cool setting. To prevent chaffing, some people also find it helpful to avoid tight-fitting undergarments. Most creams and lotions do no good and may even irritate.

Finally, a healthy immune system may be important in controlling the virus. Don't ignore the need for proper nutrition, exercise, and rest.


Well, as far as treatment goes drugs containing ACYCLOVIR (such as Zovirax) are said to be the most efective and are usually used by doctors to treat herpes. You should see your doctor about it, but I have to tell you that it does go away without any sort of treatment.

#4 diopatra

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 01:12 PM

gargle with BACTIDOL. i dunno if its available on your place but its good for mouth problems.

#5 oceanic

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 02:07 PM

As mentioned by Andromeda18_ , cold sore is life long infection. No cure for now.
But, did you say cold sores inside your lips?!
I'm not too sure about that.
Best to check with your dentist/doctor.

And, avoid direct contact when cold sores episodes arrive to avoid passing it on to someone else. That's just evil (if you dont)!
Your bf should have stayed away when he had it.

#6 taintedlove

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 03:26 PM

I don't think its a cold sore. Is it greyish, or yellow? If it is, its probably a canker sore. I always get those due to my braces. My parents thnk its because I have too much " hot gas" O.O in me. I have no idea what that means, but its some werid Chinese thing and I have to drink more water.

Rising your mouth with salt water (homemade) really stings, but it numbs the pain and it does help heal it. If that doesn't work, you can always put salt on it... but remember, it stings like a b*tch. >.<

#7 indoor

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 03:42 PM

a good suggestion is to drink loads of water

#8 pwanda

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 06:51 AM

its called Herpes. u better get out ur aciclovir :D



does cold sores = gential herpe complex 1?


there are two types of Herpes simplex viruses - HSV1 & HSV2

Genital herpes is mostly caused by HSV2, whilst the oral kind (cold sores) is mostly HSV1.

#9 _inwonderland

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 05:09 PM

I don't think its a cold sore. Is it greyish, or yellow? If it is, its probably a canker sore. I always get those due to my braces. My parents thnk its because I have too much " hot gas" O.O in me. I have no idea what that means, but its some werid Chinese thing and I have to drink more water.

Rising your mouth with salt water (homemade) really stings, but it numbs the pain and it does help heal it. If that doesn't work, you can always put salt on it... but remember, it stings like a b*tch. >.<


Yeah that's what my mom told me too and she also told me that I didn't get enough sleep. I never really could find the logic in the latter, but back in high school, a friend told me (I think she read in a magazine or something) that if you don't get enough sleep, then it's harder to focus and you could end up biting yourself and thus causing a canker sore (or whatever else you want to refer to it as).

But anyway, I wouldn't recommend the salt method unless you can really stand the pain. One time I had a huge sore in my mouth and my brother took a bunch of salt and pretty much rubbed it into the wound with force...yes, well let's say it didn't get any better.

Anyway, good luck.

#10 tazzy

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 12:05 AM

Yeh I've had cold sores before.... Had one that was really bad and it was like a whitish clear area. It's really painful to eat at that time. But definitely contagious and not a good idea to share other stuff during that time.

And I've never found a way to get a quicker cure so far. Any suggestions?

#11 Shellster

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 03:14 AM

Sores inside your mouth you mean? Like the ones you get when you eat "yeet hay" stuff? Lol, that's what my mom always tells me when I get them. Actually, I have one really painful one now in my mouth, right near one of my sharp teeth so it really hurts to move my mouth. =(

But I found out recently that they're called canker sores, and no, they're not contagious. They should heal in a few days. I did a google search about it. =P Doctor's don't really know why people get them either.

#12 hellsage

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 04:17 AM

Shellster:

They should heal in a few days.


No, it lasts longer than a few days. There are chinese treatments.

Cold sores occur on the lips where everyone can see. Canker sores occur inside the mouth. Cold sores last about two weeks.

Andromeda18 has put an informative post.

#13 Shellster

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 05:35 AM

Cold sores occur on the lips where everyone can see. Canker sores occur inside the mouth. Cold sores last about two weeks.

Andromeda18 has put an informative post.


Ooo, sorries. :blush I read the title of the post and it said "inside" so I immediately thought "inside the mouth." And I used to mix up cold sores and canker sores, so I was thinking that's what she meant. :duh

#14 chimmykanga

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 05:57 PM

the cold sore is probably an infection from when you bit you lip

#15 SwTbaByGuRL5i0

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 12:01 AM

i think you guys have cold sore herpes and yes it is contagious. And your lips will take sometime to heal. You could buy some cold sore cream/ lip balm to relieve your lips...

#16 lting77

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 12:17 AM

cold sores = herpes simplex
can be spread through saliva, so think twice before sharing a bottled drink w/ yr buddies

doctor can prescribe acyclovir to accelerate healing
(the cream doesn't work well)

#17 jennyjackman

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 07:17 PM

The answer to your first question is yes. Cold sore infection can be contagious and Herpes Simplex Type 1 virus can spread from one person to another through kissing.

The first thing you can do to reduce your tingling and pain is to apply cold ice or tea bags on your infected area. This will help you soothe your cold sore pain on your lips.

Next step you can do is to start taking Lysine supplement and apply Lysine lotion on your lips. This will improve your immune system that can in turn help to reduce the cold sore infection in next few days.

You can also check out the best cold sore remedies on the internet to get rid of your infection painlessly and quickly.

#18 Goldencarp

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 09:28 PM

NEVER share drinks, and always keep your mouth clean ... rinse regularly after meals, and sometimes snacks, including around the teeth, under the tongue and sometimes
throat. Regular rinsing will help reduce the odds of any crap in the mouth. Also, salt water will help relieve pain the mouth ... do not rub salt on wounds or bumps, just use water
with some salt in it. If it doesn't taste and feel salty enough, add more

Take your time to eat, don't eat too fast or you might bite yourself. Chew well, then swallow

and when you brush your teeth, sorta "take it easy", don't brush too hard, especially around the gums. If it bleeds, then rinse your mouth well right away and continue

Also, get enough Vitamin C, like from oranges or orange juice, helps boost immune system

Edited by Goldencarp, 27 August 2011 - 09:30 PM.


#19 Nitikie

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 06:40 AM

Im sure the original poster should know what they have since posting this thread.

This is for people with canker sores seeking relief.

If u have canker sores use hydrogen peroxide instead of salt water swish/gargle which really doesn't work too well at all. The peroxide works faster then a salt water swish/gargle, it can hurt but it'll heal faster and won't leave a salty mouth. The peroxide will fuzz, let it. Just use a cotton swab dab it with peroxide and then onto the site.

This tip comes from nurses and dentist assistants.