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#2081 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 10:13 PM

안 녕 하 세요? 나 는 ika 입 니 다.


안녕하세요 이카씨? 만나서 반갑습니다~

#2082 AC Aguinaldo

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 05:19 AM

가사합니다 ^^ 질문하나 다 있어요 ^o^ This is not about the language but it's still about Korea.

I tried searching this but I can't find the right terms hahahah..


I watched this KDrama 사랑 비/love rain/love rides the rain. It's about this guy fell in love with this girl but didn't get a chance to marry. after 20 years, the girl had a daughter and the guy had a son. Then they're children met and fell in love with each other. Also the guy met the girl and they're still deeply in love with each other.

my question is: If the guy and the girl were married, is it possible that the son can marry the daughter?

#2083 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 05:33 AM

가사합니다 ^^ 질문하나 다 있어요 ^o^ This is not about the language but it's still about Korea.

I tried searching this but I can't find the right terms hahahah..


I watched this KDrama 사랑 비/love rain/love rides the rain. It's about this guy fell in love with this girl but didn't get a chance to marry. after 20 years, the girl had a daughter and the guy had a son. Then they're children met and fell in love with each other. Also the guy met the girl and they're still deeply in love with each other.

my question is: If the guy and the girl were married, is it possible that the son can marry the daughter?

It is very unlikely and probably no hehehe. Drama writers are very good story tellers hahaha

#2084 Tallulah_

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 08:16 PM

시원함 noun(cool) / 시원한 adjective(cooling) / 시원하다 expressive verb(i feel cool breeze!) / 시원해요=시원하네요 formal conversation(I can feel cool breeze) / 시원하네=시원하다 informal conversation(i can feel cool breeze)
이쁨 noun(beauty) / 이쁜 adjective(beautiful) / 이쁘다 expressive verb(someone is beautiful!) / 이뻐요=이쁘네요 formal conversation(you're beautiful) / 이쁘네=이쁘다 informal conversation(you're beautiful)

시원한다 and 이쁜다 expressive verbs are not correct. Adjective form has bottom consonant ㄴ, and if you want to convert to expressive verb from adjective, you have to drop ㄴand add 다.

I hope that helps Posted Image




Thank you so much, that's very helpful!!

Another thing I've wondered about are suffixes like -서 or -으니까 and -는데. I don't know exactly how to use them. Could you make an example with -는데? And are there more of these suffixes?
Instead of 가게 에 갔어요 하고 친구를 만났어요., Koreans say 가게에 가서 친구를 만났어요, is that right? Or would the version with 하고 also be right?

Would be great if you found the time to answer this!!¨

#2085 AC Aguinaldo

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 03:38 AM

It is very unlikely and probably no hehehe. Drama writers are very good story tellers hahaha


I just wonder if there is any law that won't allow that to happen ^o^ thank you by the way ^^

#2086 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 03:53 AM

Thank you so much, that's very helpful!!

Another thing I've wondered about are suffixes like -서 or -으니까 and -는데. I don't know exactly how to use them. Could you make an example with -는데? And are there more of these suffixes?
Instead of 가게 에 갔어요 하고 친구를 만났어요., Koreans say 가게에 가서 친구를 만났어요, is that right? Or would the version with 하고 also be right?

Would be great if you found the time to answer this!!¨



~서 means '~because of this reason', and ~니까 means '~for that reason'; although they both have different meaning, they are interchangeable. ~는데 means '~but then(casual connective)'. These are very advanced conjunctions in Korean grammar.
Yes, there are many of these suffixes like those such as,
1. ~에 대해서 (someone or something is being acted regarding.....)
ex) 우리는 프로젝트에 대해서 편지를 씁니다. We are writing to you regarding the project.
2. ~에 쓰이고 있는 (something is being used for)
ex) 비행기 생산에 쓰이고 있는 재료입니다. This material is being used for airplane production.
3. 무슨 (object word) 이길래~ What's causing something to happen?
ex) 무슨 일 이길래 대답을 못합니까? What's causing you not to answer my question? = did cat got your tongue?

yes....가게에 가서 친구를 만났어요 is right. You can also say 가게에 갔어요. 그리고 친구를 만났어요 instead of saying 가게에 갔어요 하고 친구를 만났어요. :)

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 05 January 2013 - 03:54 AM.


#2087 Louann

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 08:31 AM

i have question:

i always see these to things: 도 and ㄷ도 (w/ the two ㄷ together)

what does it mean??

also, i saw this sentence:

나도 내가 너무 좋아

does it mean "i like you a lot, too?"
cuz i know 나도 means "me too"
"내" means "i" and so on....
and why do they have to use "nado" and "naega".....they're like saying "i" two times in one sentence....confused...hehe Posted Image


Yes~ It means "I really like you too" since 너무 means a lot , or really...:)

#2088 Louann

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 09:11 AM

wat is oppa??
how do we say i love hyori in korea Posted Image

hm i writed vancouver bfore..


You can simply say "Hyori는 사랑한다" (Hyorineun saranghanda~) ^^

#2089 minjae028

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:07 AM

Heya all.. can somebody here explain to me why "bieup" is sometimes pronounced as "mieum"..
We have a foreign language and it is KOREAN.. I actually know how to pronounced the letters.. all i need right now is to learn more words..

please give me some example of korean sentences that are being used for intoducing yourself.. and for some normal conversation.. :D

please give some examples of sentences used in introducing yourself and the normal sentences used among friends..

annyeonghaseyo joneun ariel-imnida!

#2090 Tallulah_

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 11:06 AM

~서 means '~because of this reason', and ~니까 means '~for that reason'; although they both have different meaning, they are interchangeable. ~는데 means '~but then(casual connective)'. These are very advanced conjunctions in Korean grammar.
Yes, there are many of these suffixes like those such as,
1. ~에 대해서 (someone or something is being acted regarding.....)
ex) 우리는 프로젝트에 대해서 편지를 씁니다. We are writing to you regarding the project.
2. ~에 쓰이고 있는 (something is being used for)
ex) 비행기 생산에 쓰이고 있는 재료입니다. This material is being used for airplane production.
3. 무슨 (object word) 이길래~ What's causing something to happen?
ex) 무슨 일 이길래 대답을 못합니까? What's causing you not to answer my question? = did cat got your tongue?

yes....가게에 가서 친구를 만났어요 is right. You can also say 가게에 갔어요. 그리고 친구를 만났어요 instead of saying 가게에 갔어요 하고 친구를 만났어요. Posted Image



Okay, great!!

You are right though; some of these are very advanced, so to use some of them, I'll wait until I get better at Korean :)
There are two of them I recently learned though and these are ~ᄅ 수 있어요. and ~ᄅ 줄 알아요.
Does it make any difference if I say...

- 운전 할 수 있어요.
or
- 운전 할 줄 알아요.

...?

Thanks in advance, you're great for answering all my annoying questions :blush :)

#2091 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:39 AM

Okay, great!!

You are right though; some of these are very advanced, so to use some of them, I'll wait until I get better at Korean Posted Image
There are two of them I recently learned though and these are ~ᄅ 수 있어요. and ~ᄅ 줄 알아요.
Does it make any difference if I say...

- 운전 할 수 있어요.
or
- 운전 할 줄 알아요.

...?

Thanks in advance, you're great for answering all my annoying questions Posted Image Posted Image


Yes they are different but correct sentences. However, to make those statements sound more natural, you need to add pronoun such as "I" or "you". For example,
제가 운전 할 수 있어요. means "I can drive" and 저 운전 할 줄 알아요. means "I know how to drive". 제가 and 저 are both "I" in formal form. There are many different ways to say "I" (around 10~15 of them).

"I" variations: 내가(both formal and informal), 제가(formal), 저는 or 전(formal), 나는 or 난(both formal and informal), 저(formal), 나(both formal and informal).......there are probably more, but I can't think of them off the top of my head hehe.

If you have questions, feel free to ask me anytime!

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 19 January 2013 - 03:05 AM.


#2092 gelled02

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 11:12 AM

heyy just no need to so much worried to learn any language bcoz nothing is impossible ..
i was also beginner while i have started to learn Korean but now i am so perfect to speak and now ..
i would like to shear my exp. on this..
korean

#2093 Tallulah_

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:19 PM

그거 정말 도움이, 고마워요! (Is that correct?)

Okay, I think I get it.

However, you wrote that 나는 and 내가 were both formal and informal. So would it be rude to say to my teacher: " 운전 할 줄 알아요." or would 운전 할 줄 알아요.

Can 나/내가/나는 or 너/니가/너는 be combined with verbs ending with -요 at all?

Thanks again for offering your help :wave2!



Yes they are different but correct sentences. However, to make those statements sound more natural, you need to add pronoun such as "I" or "you". For example,
제가 운전 할 수 있어요. means "I can drive" and 저 운전 할 줄 알아요. means "I know how to drive". 제가 and 저 are both "I" in formal form. There are many different ways to say "I" (around 10~15 of them).

"I" variations: 내가(both formal and informal), 제가(formal), 저는 or 전(formal), 나는 or 난(both formal and informal), 저(formal), 나(both formal and informal).......there are probably more, but I can't think of them off the top of my head hehe.

If you have questions, feel free to ask me anytime!


Yes they are different but correct sentences. However, to make those statements sound more natural, you need to add pronoun such as "I" or "you". For example,
제가 운전 할 수 있어요. means "I can drive" and 저 운전 할 줄 알아요. means "I know how to drive". 제가 and 저 are both "I" in formal form. There are many different ways to say "I" (around 10~15 of them).

"I" variations: 내가(both formal and informal), 제가(formal), 저는 or 전(formal), 나는 or 난(both formal and informal), 저(formal), 나(both formal and informal).......there are probably more, but I can't think of them off the top of my head hehe.

If you have questions, feel free to ask me anytime!




Oops, I made a mistake with posting, so please ignore post #2094.
Here's what I actually wanted to write:


그거 정말 도움이, 고마워요! (Is that correct?)

Okay, I think I get it.

However, you wrote that 나는 and 내가 were both formal and informal. So would it be rude to say to my teacher: " 운전 할 줄 알아요." or would 운전 할 줄 알아요.

Can 나/내가/나는 or 너/니가/너는 be combined with verbs ending with -요 at all?

Thanks again for offering your help Posted Image!

#2094 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 07:28 AM

그거 정말 도움이, 고마워요! (Is that correct?)

Okay, I think I get it.

However, you wrote that 나는 and 내가 were both formal and informal. So would it be rude to say to my teacher: " 운전 할 줄 알아요." or would 운전 할 줄 알아요.

Can 나/내가/나는 or 너/니가/너는 be combined with verbs ending with -요 at all?

Thanks again for offering your help Posted Image!











Oops, I made a mistake with posting, so please ignore post #2094.
Here's what I actually wanted to write:


그거 정말 도움이, 고마워요! (Is that correct?)

Okay, I think I get it.

However, you wrote that 나는 and 내가 were both formal and informal. So would it be rude to say to my teacher: " 운전 할 줄 알아요." or would 운전 할 줄 알아요.

Can 나/내가/나는 or 너/니가/너는 be combined with verbs ending with -요 at all?

Thanks again for offering your help Posted Image!


Hello there again Posted Image

나 운전 할 줄 알아요 is formal casual, and 저 운전 할 줄 알아요 is formal but not casual...but you can use both if you like. However, if other person is 아줌마, 아저씨,
or old person, "저" sounds more polite to them.
나/내가/나는 + 요 is also formal casual. But 너/니가/너는 is strictly informal and cannot be formal casual, and therefore adding 요 at the end is incorrect. Sometimes they use that incorrect sentence mixing with curse words in comedy to make people laugh lol

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 27 January 2013 - 07:34 AM.


#2095 Izan0714

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 01:13 PM

Annyeong chinguya. . . :)

Izan imnida. . . i'm a filipino and i'm studying korean language by myself. . .

I've read your convo and help me a lot. . . Kamsahamnida. . .

Can we be friends on facebook :))

Izan Peñaflor was profile name. .

I have a lot of questions when writing korean. . .

#2096 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:38 PM

Annyeong chinguya. . . Posted Image

Izan imnida. . . i'm a filipino and i'm studying korean language by myself. . .

I've read your convo and help me a lot. . . Kamsahamnida. . .

Can we be friends on facebook Posted Image)

Izan Peñaflor was profile name. .

I have a lot of questions when writing korean. . .


Hello Izan! Nice meeting you!
Unfortunately, I don't have facebook account for now, because I'm so caught up with my school work. But if you have questions, feel free to PM me or ask me. I check this thread daily, in case someone has more questions. :)

#2097 Tallulah_

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 08:20 PM

Hello there again Posted Image

나 운전 할 줄 알아요 is formal casual, and 저 운전 할 줄 알아요 is formal but not casual...but you can use both if you like. However, if other person is 아줌마, 아저씨,
or old person, "저" sounds more polite to them.
나/내가/나는 + 요 is also formal casual. But 너/니가/너는 is strictly informal and cannot be formal casual, and therefore adding 요 at the end is incorrect. Sometimes they use that incorrect sentence mixing with curse words in comedy to make people laugh lol


Hello and :TY for answering!

Okay, I'll try to remember that.
While reading your answer, I suddenly wondered how it is about "us" and "we" in Korean. I heard people using 우리(는/가) and
저희(는/가). Could you tell me what the difference between these words is and how to use them. Is one of these expressions formal and the other casual?

#2098 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 06:35 PM

Hello and Posted Image for answering!

Okay, I'll try to remember that.
While reading your answer, I suddenly wondered how it is about "us" and "we" in Korean. I heard people using 우리(는/가) and
저희(는/가). Could you tell me what the difference between these words is and how to use them. Is one of these expressions formal and the other casual?


Hello again~
Sometimes 는/가 particles can be really confusing. Simple way to look at it is ~는 marks that subject(either person or object) is important. For example, "우리는 한글을 쓸 줄 알아요"(We know how to write Korean language.). "우리는 학생 입니다"(We are students.). "우리는 큰일 났어요" (We are in big trouble.).
~가 particle describes the person's action or object's movement. For example, "우리가 집안 청소를 하겠습니다" (We will clean the house). "열차가 빠르네요" (The train is very fast)
The differences between 우리(는/가) and 저희(는/가) are 우리(는/가) can be used as both casual formal and informal conversation, and 저희(는/가)is strictly formal. If you are making conversation with someone who is older than you, I would prefer 저희(는/가).

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 03 February 2013 - 07:22 PM.


#2099 Tallulah_

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 10:24 PM

Hello again~
Sometimes 는/가 particles can be really confusing. Simple way to look at it is ~는 marks that subject(either person or object) is important. For example, "우리는 한글을 쓸 줄 알아요"(We know how to write Korean language.). "우리는 학생 입니다"(We are students.). "우리는 큰일 났어요" (We are in big trouble.).
~가 particle describes the person's action or object's movement. For example, "우리가 집안 청소를 하겠습니다" (We will clean the house). "열차가 빠르네요" (The train is very fast)
The differences between 우리(는/가) and 저희(는/가) are 우리(는/가) can be used as both casual formal and informal conversation, and 저희(는/가)is strictly formal. If you are making conversation with someone who is older than you, I would prefer 저희(는/가).



Hello and once again, thanks for your help!!

I have one more question regarding our older topic about 너/니가/너는. You told me those expression was strictly casual. I heard that there exists another "you", "당신" which I must be really careful about, because it's very, very formal on the one hand and on the other hand, it can also be understood as an insult. Is there another "you", which can for example be while talking to 어머니?

Another thing is, that I don't know how to say "I don't understand". Like, if I went to Korea and lived with a host family and my host mother would tell me something and I didn't understand the sentence (because my korean is poor). How could I express that?

Thanks in advance!! =)

#2100 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 11:32 PM

Hello and once again, thanks for your help!!

I have one more question regarding our older topic about 너/니가/너는. You told me those expression was strictly casual. I heard that there exists another "you", "당신" which I must be really careful about, because it's very, very formal on the one hand and on the other hand, it can also be understood as an insult. Is there another "you", which can for example be while talking to 어머니?

Another thing is, that I don't know how to say "I don't understand". Like, if I went to Korea and lived with a host family and my host mother would tell me something and I didn't understand the sentence (because my korean is poor). How could I express that?

Thanks in advance!! =)

Hello Tallulah!

너/니가 is strictly informal, and you only use it when the person is same age or under you. but if you have met this person for only a few occasions, Koreans don't usually use '너/니가' regardless of how old they are (unless they are children). You can initiate informal conversation (with someone who is same age or under you) by saying "말 놔도 되요?"....and they will say, "네 그러세요", which means 'yes fine'. from then on, you only speak informally to that person(it doesn't matter if it's strict or casual). if they disagree, then you are not allowed to speak informally. Some occasions, people change formality in conversation without asking, and it's usually considered to be rude.

yes you're right about 당신. it's only used if you are speaking to your husband or wife and it means 'sweet heart'. but when you use 당신 to someone else, it has different meaning.....it's same as calling someone 'hey, you over there!'.....and it's rude to say that. Speaking to parents, they use 아빠 엄마 or 아버지 어머니...but never 'you'. Koreans use only 20% of 'you' comparing to Americans on normal conversation, and they usually call by names.....for instance,
-name+오빠(male), -name+누나(female): person who is older than you and know them well; older brother or sister
-name+씨(both male and female): person you don't know that well
name+아(name ends with bottom consonant); name+야(name has no bottom consonant): person who is younger than you and previously engaged informal conversation; younger sister or brother.

For "I don't understand", you have to be specific why you don't understand. ~가 잘 이해가 안되요(for the words have no bottom consonant) or ~이 잘 이해가 안되요 (for the words have bottom consonant). For example:
영어가 잘 이해가 안되요 : I don't understand English well.
역사가 잘 이해가 안되요: I don't understand this history well.
한국말이 잘 이해가 안되요: I don't understand Korean well.
수학이 잘 이해가 안되요: I don't understand this math well.
If you're speaking informally, you can just drop 요 at the end.

Ask me if you more questions!

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 12 February 2013 - 03:59 AM.


#2101 citrani

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:35 PM

Annyeong hasaeyo …
Indonesiaesso citra imnida … ~@^_^@~

I learned Japanese at university …it seems like Korean and Japanese have similar pattern of sentences.

I am not studying Korean but I learn from variety shows or drama to get use to hear it.

My 1st question is :
Please tell me the difference between kuroccho and kurocchi (I am so curious about those cho and chi )
I don't even know how to write them properly. Mianhae....

2) molla ni (as far as I know molla means do not know, what about "ni")

Tq

#2102 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:56 AM

Annyeong hasaeyo …
Indonesiaesso citra imnida … ~@Posted Image@~

I learned Japanese at university …it seems like Korean and Japanese have similar pattern of sentences.

I am not studying Korean but I learn from variety shows or drama to get use to hear it.

My 1st question is :
Please tell me the difference between kuroccho and kurocchi (I am so curious about those cho and chi )
I don't even know how to write them properly. Mianhae....

2) molla ni (as far as I know molla means do not know, what about "ni")

Tq


Hello there, and nice meeting you citrani! To answer your questions,
1) both 그렇죠(gurocho) and 그렇지(gurochi) have same meaning, but 그렇죠 is formal and 그렇지 is informal. It means "Am I right?" or "Do you agree?".
2) it actually pronounces "mollan ni?" 몰랐니?(informal), and it means "you didn't know that?" or "you don't know that?". molla 몰라 means "I don't know"(informal).

:)

#2103 citrani

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:06 PM

Ok....tq
May i go on with next questions? :-)
(still refer to my previous questions)

1. ~~cho/chi
do we put a verb or an adjective before cho/chi? Or it works for both?

2. ~~nni
same question... Verb or adjective?
and how to say "molanni" in formal way?

3. i heard them occasionally using ~~gu... What does is mean?
~~ragu means "i said. ...." i guess. :-)
but there is another ending with ~~gu but not the one with the meaning "i said..."

4. it sounds the same to me when korean says ㅈ (J) & ㅊ ©, is it dialect, or they do pronounce both at the same way?
or it is just something wrong with my ears... Honestly i got problem with my ears :-) i missheard even my native language a lot :-)

5. what is the difference between ukkyo and ukki? i refer to word "funny"

Thank you so much for your kindness answering my questions

#2104 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 04:59 AM

Ok....tq
May i go on with next questions? :-)
(still refer to my previous questions)

1. ~~cho/chi
do we put a verb or an adjective before cho/chi? Or it works for both?

2. ~~nni
same question... Verb or adjective?
and how to say "molanni" in formal way?

3. i heard them occasionally using ~~gu... What does is mean?
~~ragu means "i said. ...." i guess. :-)
but there is another ending with ~~gu but not the one with the meaning "i said..."

4. it sounds the same to me when korean says ㅈ (J) & ㅊ ©, is it dialect, or they do pronounce both at the same way?
or it is just something wrong with my ears... Honestly i got problem with my ears :-) i missheard even my native language a lot :-)

5. what is the difference between ukkyo and ukki? i refer to word "funny"

Thank you so much for your kindness answering my questions


1. they are actually pronounced ~jyo죠/~ji지....but when bottom consonantㅎandㅈare right next to each other, those end particles are pronounced as ~cho or ~chi. And yes, they can be used on both verbs and adjectives.

2. ~ni?~니? can be used for both adjectives and adverbs. By adding another n to ~ni, it becomes past tense.
ex) 몰랐니? (molan ni?) you didn't know it? or 모르니? (moru ni?) you don't know it?
공부했니? (gong boo haenni?) did you study? or 공부하니? (gong boo hani?) are you studying?
그여자 예쁘니? (gu yeoja yepuni?) is she pretty? or 그여자 예뻤니? (gu yeoja yepun ni?) was she pretty?

3. it's actually ~rago....but ~ragu sounds more friendlier. it is a particle and confirms existence or possession. for instance, gu yeoja nuen nae chingoo rago. 그 여자는 내 친구라고. She 'IS' my friend.
Koreans often use ~harago, which has different meaning. By adding noun in front of ~harago, you're telling your friend (or someone who's younger than you) to do something. one example would be, 공부하라고~ (gong boo harago~) why don't you study~

4. ㅈ is pronounced as ㅊ, when ㅈ and bottom consonant ㅎ are right next to each other .
ex) 좋지? (jo chi?)is it good? 아프지? (apu ji?) is it hurting?

5. it actually pronounces as (ut gi uh)웃겨, but you have to say it really fast, which means it's funny.
I have no idea what 'ukki' means though hehehe.

You're welcome sweetie~ Feel free to ask anytime ^_^

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 21 February 2013 - 05:16 AM.


#2105 citrani

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 02:59 PM

Kim씨 daebak!

I learned a lot from you. Thank you.....
I need more help..... :-)

1) would you like to ~ (formal and informal )
2) let's ~ (formal and informal )

3) 몰랐니 = past tense, is it formal or informal.... ?
I would like to know how to say it in formal way.

4) it sounds like ~moru gesso? What does it mean..?

Thank you so much....



#2106 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:38 PM

Kim씨 daebak!

I learned a lot from you. Thank you.....
I need more help..... :-)

1) would you like to ~ (formal and informal )
2) let's ~ (formal and informal )

3) 몰랐니 = past tense, is it formal or informal.... ?
I would like to know how to say it in formal way.

4) it sounds like ~moru gesso? What does it mean..?

Thank you so much....


Hello there again hehehe.

1. would you like to (do something)?
formal: ~하실래요? (hashil leyo?)
formal casual: ~할래요? (hal leyo?)
informal: ~할래? (hal le?)
It's so easy to make sentence with these. you can just add nouns(that are independent from verb stems) in the front.
a few examples of vocabularies that are independent from verb stems are: 공부(gongboo)study, 컴퓨터computer, 운동(un dong)exercise, 게임game, 일(eel)work, etc etc

ex) 저와 공부+하실래요? juh wa gongboo hashil leyo? (would you like to study with me?)
저와 운동+하실래요? juh wa un dong hashil leyo? (would you like to exercise with me?)
저와 일+하실래요? juh wa eel hashil leyo? (would you like to work with me?)

2. This is also easy. just switch hashil leyo to followings, and rest stay the same.
formal: hashi jo
formal casual: haeyo
informal: haja

3. 몰랐니(you didn't know?) is very informal.
formal: 모르셨나요? moru shun nayo?
formal casual: 몰랐어요? mola ssuh yo?
informal: 몰랐니? molan ni?

4. 모르겠어 moru gesso (I don't know) is informal
formal: 모르겠어요 moru gesso yo
formal casual: 몰라요 mola yo
informal: 몰라 mola or 모르겠어.

One more thing, hehehe. Koreans usually use first name or full name + 씨, which is little different than Japan (they use either last or first name + san) and America(Mr or Mrs + last name, etc). However, it's not incorrect when someone uses last name+씨. Mostly middle aged or old men would use it to other men(아저씨) just to be friendly, but younger guys don't use it.

:)


Edited by Jennifer Kim, 22 February 2013 - 06:47 AM.


#2107 citrani

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 08:36 PM

Thank you, jennifer 씨
I love learning from you...
I Hope more questions would be alright...

1) ottoke, ottokaji....
2) ~julle? i assume it is the same as ~halle?
3) what about mollaso? Is it the same as mollayo?
4) guromyeon, animyeon....
5) ~nikka...

Btw, i like how u answered my questions. However, since i asked you just what i heard, i am really sorry for your inconvenience :-)

Thank you so much

#2108 Tallulah_

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:57 PM

Hello Tallulah!

너/니가 is strictly informal, and you only use it when the person is same age or under you. but if you have met this person for only a few occasions, Koreans don't usually use '너/니가' regardless of how old they are (unless they are children). You can initiate informal conversation (with someone who is same age or under you) by saying "말 놔도 되요?"....and they will say, "네 그러세요", which means 'yes fine'. from then on, you only speak informally to that person(it doesn't matter if it's strict or casual). if they disagree, then you are not allowed to speak informally. Some occasions, people change formality in conversation without asking, and it's usually considered to be rude.

yes you're right about 당신. it's only used if you are speaking to your husband or wife and it means 'sweet heart'. but when you use 당신 to someone else, it has different meaning.....it's same as calling someone 'hey, you over there!'.....and it's rude to say that. Speaking to parents, they use 아빠 엄마 or 아버지 어머니...but never 'you'. Koreans use only 20% of 'you' comparing to Americans on normal conversation, and they usually call by names.....for instance,
-name+오빠(male), -name+누나(female): person who is older than you and know them well; older brother or sister
-name+씨(both male and female): person you don't know that well
name+아(name ends with bottom consonant); name+야(name has no bottom consonant): person who is younger than you and previously engaged informal conversation; younger sister or brother.

For "I don't understand", you have to be specific why you don't understand. ~가 잘 이해가 안되요(for the words have no bottom consonant) or ~이 잘 이해가 안되요 (for the words have bottom consonant). For example:
영어가 잘 이해가 안되요 : I don't understand English well.
역사가 잘 이해가 안되요: I don't understand this history well.
한국말이 잘 이해가 안되요: I don't understand Korean well.
수학이 잘 이해가 안되요: I don't understand this math well.
If you're speaking informally, you can just drop 요 at the end.

Ask me if you more questions!


Hello Jennifer씨, guess who's back!! :)

Jennifer씨 다시 고마워요!! (Is it correct to say it like this?)


Well I guess I'm just going to ask more and more questions, so if I go on your nerves, feel free to stop me okay ;)

- So about the whole "I don't understand" - thing:


I currently work in a restaurant and the husband of my boss phoned and asked me: 오늘 손님이 많았어? And I didn't understand the word "손님". How could I have expressed that? Perhaps like this:손님이 뜻이 이해가 안되요! or 손님이 무슨 뜻이에요?
And how do I say "word", as in I don't understand this "word"?





-Another request:
Could you list a few important verbs you use all the time, in all-day situations? I know some simple and basic verbs like 일하다, 하다, 보다, 만나다, 듣다, 좋아하다 and so on, but could you tell me some verbs like to forget, to search, to be funny, to be interesting, to be perfect, to be boring, to be weird, to be clumsy and so on. And maybe some others which popped into your mind? ^_^

Thaaaank yoou!!!!!!

#2109 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 02:14 AM

Hello Jennifer씨, guess who's back!! Posted Image

Jennifer씨 다시 고마워요!! (Is it correct to say it like this?)

Well I guess I'm just going to ask more and more questions, so if I go on your nerves, feel free to stop me okay Posted Image

- So about the whole "I don't understand" - thing:

I currently work in a restaurant and the husband of my boss phoned and asked me: 오늘 손님이 많았어? And I didn't understand the word "손님". How could I have expressed that? Perhaps like this:손님이 뜻이 이해가 안되요! or 손님이 무슨 뜻이에요?
And how do I say "word", as in I don't understand this "word"?
-Another request:
Could you list a few important verbs you use all the time, in all-day situations? I know some simple and basic verbs like 일하다, 하다, 보다, 만나다, 듣다, 좋아하다 and so on, but could you tell me some verbs like to forget, to search, to be funny, to be interesting, to be perfect, to be boring, to be weird, to be clumsy and so on. And maybe some others which popped into your mind? Posted Image
Thaaaank yoou!!!!!!


안녕하세요 탈루아씨! 다시 만나서 반가와요!

correct way to say is, 제니퍼씨 또 한번 감사드려요!! Posted Image

no not at all~, you can ask me anytime!

1. Koreans hate particles, they tend to skip alot. so instead of saying 오늘 손님이 많았어?, you can say 오늘 손님 많았어? both are grammatically correct. If you don't know the word 손님 and you want to ask your husband, you can say something like
-> 손님이 영어로 뭐죠? How do you say 손님 in English?
-> 손님이란 단어를 잘 모르겠어요. (I don't understand the word '손님'). 영어로 뭐죠? (How do you say it in English?)
-> 손님이란 뜻을 영어로 모르겠어요.(I don't understand 손님 in English) 한국어로 가르쳐 주실래요?(Could you teach me in Korean?)

2. 'I don't understand this word' can be translated into '이 단어 뜻을 잘 모르겠어요'.

3.I wrote down list of phrases that are commonly used instead.
이 문장 영어로 번역좀 해주실래요? Can you translate this(or these) written phrase(s) into English?
이거 주세요 Please give me this, I want to buy it. / 얼마죠? how much? (you can apply this in any situation)
이거 얼마죠? How much is this cost?
이거 어디서 사셨어요? Where did you buy this, please tell me.
지금 노래 듣고있어요(particle '를'can be skipped) I'm listening to music right now.
운전하고 그쪽으로 가는길이에요. I'm on the way by driving.
너무 배불러요. 더 이상 못먹겠어요. I'm too full. I can't eat more.
저 남자 진짜 잘 생겼네요. That man is very handsome.
저 여자 모델같이 생겼어요. That woman looks like a model.
이거 너무 이쁘네요. This thing is very pretty (or cute)
죄송해요. 제가 쫌 바빠서 집에 가야하거든요. I'm very sorry. I'm little busy and I must go home now.
제니퍼씨, 핸드폰 울리는데요?. Jennifer, your cell phone is ringing / 제니퍼씨, 전화오는데요? Jennifer, your phone is ringing.
대박 맛있네요. This is food is the bomb.
시원한거 드실래요? Do you wanna drink something cold? 따끈한거 드실래요? Do you wanna drink something warm?
우리 밥먹으로 가요. Let's go eat somewhere.

4. vocabularies (infinitive form--> conjugated into casual polite--> conjugated informal)
to forget: 깜빡 잊다. --> 깜빡 잊었어요. --> 깜빡 잊었어
to search (on internet): 인터넷 검색하다. --> 인터넷 검색해요 --> 인터넷 검색해
to search (for stuff):~를 찾다. --> ~를 찾아요 --> ~를 찾고있어(~를 찾아 is also right but many Koreans prefer the other phrase).
to do research: 리써치 하다. --> 리써치 해요 --> 리써치 하고있어 or 리써치 해
to be funny: 웃기다. --> 웃겨요--> 웃기네 to be interesting: 재밌다. or 재미있다. --> 재미있어요 --> 재밌어
to be boring: 재미없다. -->재미없어요 --> 재미없어
to be boring (when you watch movies): 이 영화 재미 하나도 없다. --> 이 영화 재미 하나도 없어요 --> 이 영화 재미 하나도 없어.
to be perfect: 완벽하다. --> 완벽해요. --> 완벽해
to be perfect(with expression): 완전 완벽하다. --> 완전 완벽해요 or 완전 완벽하네요 --> 완전 완벽해
to be weird: 좀 이상하다. --> 좀 이상해요 or 좀 이상하네요. --> 좀 이상해 or 좀 이상하네
the man looks like homosexual: 저남자 게이같다. --> 저 남자 게이같네요 or 저 남자 게이같아요 --> 저 남자 게이같아 or 저 남자 게이같네
to be clumsy(to do something): 하기 귀찮다. --> 하기 귀찮아요 or 하기 귀찮네요. -> 하기 귀찮아 or 하기 귀찮네

I think that's about it Posted Image

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 24 February 2013 - 05:16 AM.


#2110 Meow ♡

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 09:18 PM

This thread is awesome! Been wanting to learn the basic Korean while watching my current favorite K-Drama. Thanks for sharing!

#2111 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 03:24 AM

This thread is awesome! Been wanting to learn the basic Korean while watching my current favorite K-Drama. Thanks for sharing!


Nice meeting you Angelized! Let me know if you have any questions~

#2112 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 04:30 AM

what does shi tongtong haeyo mean?


Hmm....tongtong haeyo 통통해요 is translated into "you are chubby".....it looks like the person is trying to call other person 'chubby' lol
For example, 제니퍼씨(Jennifer ssi) 통통해요! Jennifer! You're chubby!
And my normal reply would be, nuh moo hae yo 너무해요 (name+)씨 "(name), you are just too much". Posted Image

One thing about Korean language...is that unlike Chinese and Japanese, it uses an Alphabet.

Yes. 세종대왕(King Sejong) used wooden window frame(which has four squares inside each frame) as a tool to make 한글(hangul) by substituting invented sounding alphabets into the frame. Alphabets alone have no meaning but describes sound....., and as alphabets combined, it becomes a word. It's quiet interesting concept. hehehe.

Edited by Jennifer Kim, 06 March 2013 - 04:50 AM.


#2113 AC Aguinaldo

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 11:20 AM

안녕하세요 !! 하나더문제있어요 (what I mean is "hello, I have another question" You might not understand it because of my grammar Posted Image)

how do I tell my height and weight to an unni or oppa??

#2114 Jennifer Kim

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 02:55 AM

안녕하세요 !! 하나더문제있어요 (what I mean is "hello, I have another question" You might not understand it because of my grammar Posted Image)

how do I tell my height and weight to an unni or oppa??


Hello, Aguinaldo!

You can say
formal way: 제 키는 xxx센치(cm)이고, 몸무게는 xxx키로(kg) 인데요.
informal way: 내 키는 xxx센치이고, 몸무게는 xxx키로야.

you can only use informal way when unni or oppa allows you to speak that way.

:)

#2115 AC Aguinaldo

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 11:46 AM

Hello, Aguinaldo!

You can say
formal way: 제 키는 xxx센치(cm)이고, 몸무게는 xxx키로(kg) 인데요.
informal way: 내 키는 xxx센치이고, 몸무게는 xxx키로야.

you can only use informal way when unni or oppa allows you to speak that way.

Posted Image


what way of counting should I use?? Is it "hana, dul, seht, etc." or "il, i, sam, etc"??

감사합니다 for responding ^____^

#2116 Zhareena

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 06:08 PM

hi everyone! i just wanted to ask something, how will you say "If I have 5000000 won........" in korean?
help me please? :))

oh! there's more,, i want to know how to say these in korean...

1 i want to go to his (name of the person) coffee shop
2 i want to give him (name of the person) flowers
3 i want to eat his (name of the person) famous fried rice
4 i want to eat with him (name of the person)
5 i want to spend my whole day with them.
6 i want to sing with him (name of the person)
7 i want to dance with him(name of the person)

help me? pretty please? ^^

#2117 crannie

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 07:42 PM

hi everyone! i just wanted to ask something, how will you say "If I have 5000000 won........" in korean?
help me please? Posted Image)

oh! there's more,, i want to know how to say these in korean...

1 i want to go to his (name of the person) coffee shop
2 i want to give him (name of the person) flowers
3 i want to eat his (name of the person) famous fried rice
4 i want to eat with him (name of the person)
5 i want to spend my whole day with them.
6 i want to sing with him (name of the person)
7 i want to dance with him(name of the person)

help me? pretty please? ^^


저는 오백만원이 있으면..... if I have 5,000,000 won...

1. ___의 커피셥에 가고 싶어요
2. ___에게 꽃을 주고 싶어요
3. ___의 유명한 뽂음밥을 먹고 싶어요
4. ___랑 같이 밥을 먹고 싶어요
5. ???
6. ___랑 같이 노래를 부르고 싶어요
7. ___랑 같이 춤을추고 싶어요

#2118 AC Aguinaldo

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 04:04 PM

안녕하세요!! :) may I ask what is "게" in 너에개 (this means "to you" right?) and 미치게 해?? Thank you ^^

#2119 crannie

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 02:02 PM

안녕하세요!! Posted Image may I ask what is "게" in 너에개 (this means "to you" right?) and 미치게 해?? Thank you ^^


actually it is two different particles in the above examples

-에게 as you have correctly mentioned means "to ~"
so for example, 나에게 (to me), 너에게 (to you), 어머님에게 (to mother)

the 게 in 미치게 해 is a particle that transforms the adjective "미치다" (crazy) into the form 미치게 (crazily) and combined with the action verb 해 forms the phrase 미치게 해 (do it crazily)
other examples:
행복해 (happy) - 행복하게 살아 (live happily)
건강하다 (healthy) - 건강하게 지내세요 (please stay/live healthy/healthily)
  • AC Aguinaldo likes this

#2120 i98xi

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 03:21 AM

Wonderful thread! I'm also learning Koprean by myself, so I'll visit here for questions! Thanks!





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